Junk Science: Bias in the Implicit Bias Literature

For decades, psychologists have misused the scientific method and statistical significance testing. Instead of using significance tests to confirm or falsify theoretical predictions, they only published statistically significant results that confirmed predictions. This selection for significance undermines the ability of statistical tests to distinguish between true and false hypotheses (Sterling, 1959). Another problem is that … Continue reading Junk Science: Bias in the Implicit Bias Literature

Anti-Black Bias on the IAT predicts Pro-Black Bias in Behavior

Over 20 years ago, Anthony Greenwald and colleagues introduced the Implicit Association Test (IAT) as a measure of individual differences in implicit bias (Greenwald et al., 1998). The assumption underlying the IAT is that individuals can harbour unconscious, automatic, hidden, or implicit racial biases. These implicit biases are distinct from explicit bias. Somebody could be … Continue reading Anti-Black Bias on the IAT predicts Pro-Black Bias in Behavior

Implicit Racism, Starbucks, and the Failure of Experimental Social Psychology

Implicit racism is in the news again (CNN).   A manager of a Starbucks in Philadelphia called 911 to ask police to remove two Black men from the coffee store because they had not purchased anything.  The problem is that many White customers frequent Starbucks without purchasing things and the police is not called.  The incident … Continue reading Implicit Racism, Starbucks, and the Failure of Experimental Social Psychology

No Incremental Predictive Validity of Implicit Attitude Measures

The general public has accepted the idea of implicit bias; that is, individuals may be prejudice without awareness. For example, in 2018 Starbucks closed their stores for one day to train employees to detect and avoid implicit bias (cf. Schimmack, 2018). However, among psychological scientists the concept of implicit bias is controversial (Blanton et al., … Continue reading No Incremental Predictive Validity of Implicit Attitude Measures

Consider the source: Can you trust implicit social cognition researchers?

One popular topic in social psychology is persuasion. How can we make people believe something and change their attitudes. A number of variables influence how persuasive a message is. One of them is source credibility. When Donald Trump claims that he won the election, we may want to check what others say. If even Fox … Continue reading Consider the source: Can you trust implicit social cognition researchers?

US police are 12 times more likely to draw a gun in encounters with unarmed Black versus White civilians

It is a well-known fact among criminologists and other social sciences that Black US citizens are killed by police in disproportionate numbers. That is, relative to the percentage in the US population, Black civilians are killed 2 to 3 times more often than White civilians. This is about the only solid fact in the social … Continue reading US police are 12 times more likely to draw a gun in encounters with unarmed Black versus White civilians